A brief history of the charity

Values Education for Life

Values Education for Life

Values Education for Life

Charity Registration Number 1000241

Values Education for Life was founded in 1990 when David Rowse invited a number of colleagues to join him as trustees of the charity prior to registration with the Charity Commission.

 

The original trustees were David Rowse, John Eyre, Patricia Higham and Susan Aucott and the charity was given registered status on 28th August 1990.

David and John remain loyal trustees and have remained a mainstay during the past 27 years.

 

The Deed of Trust states that the Trustees had raised the sum of £50 and intended to raise other funds and accept gifts for the said objects; whilst the first part of the statement is questionable the second part is very true and from very humble beginnings and over a number of years the various trustees have raised considerable amounts of money to support and further the objects of the charity.

 

The objects contained within the Deed of Trust are:-

"The advancement of education of young people under 25 through the provision of Personal, Social, Moral and Health Education

and

"the publication of the useful results of research into the same so as to enable them to develop to their full capacity as individuals and members of society."

It is clear that the objects set out two quite clear purposes which are intertwined and intended to support and enhance each other.

 

At this time the charity also adopted a 'strap line' for use in publicity material-

"Improving the quality of life through education and training"

From its inception and over the years in order to further its work the charity has worked in collaboration with:-

•Dudley Local Education Authority

•East Birmingham College of Further Education

•The University of Central England

•The Social Morality Council

•The University of Birmingham

•The University of Lancaster

•The Values Education Council of UK

•North Warwickshire and Hinckley FE College

•The Department of Education

•NFER

•The City of Birmingham LEA

•Fordham University, New York

•International Association of Moral Education

•St George's House, Windsor Castle

and many more

 

whilst at the same time has:

•Focused on supporting vulnerable young people from disadvantage backgrounds within the Midlands area.

•Has achieved this through the provision of a number of intervention programmes aimed specifically to enhance the personal, social, moral and health education of those young people, such as "Helping Hands", "Service to Others" and "Passport to Progress", details of which can be viewed on the charity's website at www.vefl.co.uk

•Has recruited and trained volunteer mentors to provide support for young people in group settings or on a one to one basis. This training provision has been extensive and provided a clear understanding of what the charity is about, commencing at NVQ Level 1 to Higher Education at undergraduate level.

•Has successfully established and run two special schools in the Midlands area aimed at supporting disadvantaged young people and providing an education within an ethically motivated ethos based on values of social justice, equity and mutual respect.

From this extensive experience over the last 27 years the charity has developed a modus operandi that has proved to be extremely successful in helping young people mature and develop towards their full potential as responsible and principled people.

 

Values Education for Life continues to develop and extend its work within its intervention programmes and is now reviewing the possibility of opening a third special school within the Midlands area for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people who have difficulty in accepting the values regime of main stream education.

 

 

 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE CHARITY

Values Education for Life 01827 711425